Category Archives: Classical Studies

Ancient Classical Studies

The Athenian Agora

The Agora of Athens was the center of the ancient city—a large, open square, below the Acropolis, where the citizens could assemble for a wide variety of public and private purposes. The Agora was the focal point of their varied activities and here the concept of democracy was first developed and practiced. The systematic excavation of this important site was entrusted by the Greek State to the American School of Classical Studies, which began excavations in 1931, funded largely by the Rockefeller, Ford, Mellon, Kress Foundations, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

The Checklist of Greek, Latin, Demotic and Coptic Papyri, Ostraca and Tablets

The primary purpose of the Checklist of Greek, Latin, Demotic and Coptic Papyri, Ostraca and Tablets is to provide for scholars and librarians a ready bibliography of all monographic volumes, both current and out-of-print, of Greek, Latin, Demotic and Coptic documentary texts on papyrus, parchment, ostraca or wood tablets.

The Online Liddell-Scott-Jones Greek-English Lexicon

The Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (TLG) is proud to announce the release of a new online version of Liddell-Scott-Jones (LSJ), the premier lexicon for classical Greek. The TLG version represents five years of intensive work to produce a fully edited and searchable version of LSJ with links to the TLG corpus.

The Tebtunis Papyri

The Tebtunis Papyri were excavated at the dawn of the twentieth century (winter 1899/1900 CE) at the site of the ancient Graeco-Roman city of Tebtunis, located in the Fayum basin of Egypt. The expedition to Tebtunis, which was led by the British papyrologists Bernard P. Grenfell and Arthur S. Hunt, was financed for the University of California by Phoebe Apperson Hearst.

Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum – Archivum Corporis Electronicum

Collection and edition of ancient Latin inscriptions, which are indispensable as direct testimony to the study of Roman life and history. Inscriptions are a direct testimony to the most important sources for the all-round exploration of Roman life and history.

The BAHR (Bulletin Analytique d’Histoire Romaine – the Analytical Report on Roman History)

a unique bibliographical and analytical database for the purpose of knowledge and research in history and archaeology of the antique Roman world. This database relies on the minute analysis of more than 800 French and foreign reviews about the Roman world (in history, archaeology, epigraphy, numismatics, papyrology…). Since 2007, an analysis of the articles (in free text) comes alongside the keywords of most instructions. In 2013, the BAHR team decided to adapt this bibliographical tool to the new demands of the research in ancient history: now, the analysis of symposium acts and other collective works on Roman history are also integrated in the database (provided they have been published since 2012,

Roman history Research

The Ancient World Digital Library (AWDL) is an initiative of the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) at New York University. AWDL will identify, collect, curate, and provide access to a broad range of scholarly materials relevant to the study of the ancient world.

Online Egyptological Bibliography (OEB)

The Online Egyptological Bibliography (OEB) holds the largest available collection of references in Egyptology literature and is updated nearly every day. It includes the records and abstracts from Annual Egyptological Bibliography (AEB, 1947-2001), combined with Bibliographie Altägypten (BA, 1822-1946), the Aigyptos database with keywords, and more than 20,000 further items. Coverage is from 1822 to the present. Enhancements are announced as they are introduced. For What’s new see below.

The Griffith Institute (Oxford University)

The Griffith Institute was established in 1939 as the centre for Egyptology at Oxford, although the genesis of core projects date back some 40 years earlier. Francis Llewellyn Griffith, the first Professor of Egyptology at the University of Oxford, bequeathed his estate for the creation of ‘a permanent home or institute for the study of the ancient languages and antiquities of the Near East’.

The Greek-Egyptian town of Naukratis

The Greek-Egyptian town of Naukratis in the Nile Delta was a major centre of cross-cultural contact in the ancient world. This catalogue presents the wealth of archaeological finds made in late 19th and early 20th century excavations at the site, well over 17,000 objects that are today dispersed in museums worldwide. Comprising Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and Cypriot objects dating from the 7th century BC to the 7th century AD, it illustrates the rich and varied history of this important site.

The Ramesseum Papyri

‘Among the few important finds of papyri which Egyptology has to record none has been subject to greater vicissitudes … than the assemblage known under the name of the Ramesseum papyri.’ (Gardiner 1955a: 1) This online research catalogue brings together for the first time all of the surviving Middle Kingdom papyri from a 13th Dynasty shaft-tomb at Luxor that was later covered by the funerary temple of Ramses II, known as the Ramesseum.

The Duke Papyrus Archive

The Duke Papyrus Archive provides electronic access to texts about and images of nearly 1400 papyri from ancient Egypt. The target audience includes: papyrologists, ancient historians, archaeologists, biblical scholars, classicists, Coptologists, Egyptologists, students of literature and religion and all others interested in ancient Egypt. The project of conserving, interpreting, cataloguing and imaging the largely unpublished Duke papyrus collection was supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities , and is part of the Advanced Papyrological Information System (APIS) Project. Project staff at Duke have included Steven L. Hensen, John F. Oates, Peter van Minnen, Suzanne D. Corr, Paolo Mangiafico, Joshua Sosin, and John Bauschatz.

Perseus Collection: Greek and Roman Materials

Greek and Roman Materials Primary and secondary sources for the study of ancient Greece and Rome

The Perseus Digital Library

Our flagship collection, under development since 1987, covers the history, literature and culture of the Greco-Roman world. We are applying what we have learned from Classics to other subjects within the humanities and beyond. We have studied many problems over the past two decades, but our current research centers on personalization: organizing what you see to meet your needs.

Harvard Loeb Classical Library

Harvard University Press is honored to renew James Loeb’s vision of accessibility and presents an interconnected, fully searchable, perpetually growing, virtual library of all that is important in Greek and Latin literature. Epic and lyric poetry; tragedy and comedy; history, travel, philosophy, and oratory; the great medical writers and mathematicians; those Church Fathers who made particular use of pagan culture

Classics and Ancient Civilizations

Classics and Ancient Civilizations provide comprehensive training covering the entire range of present-day research on the ancient civilizations of Greece and Rome, Egypt and the Near East.

Ancient History, Greek and Roman through Late Antiquity

Digital Commons Network Open Access Digital Commons is the leading hosted institutional repository software for universities, colleges, law schools, and research centers.

ORBIS : Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World

ORBIS is an Interactive Scholarly Work created around a transportation model of the Roman world. As such, there are several different ways to access the information stored in this work:

The International Cuneiform Bibliography (KeiBi),

The KeiBi online covers all areas of ancient oriental studies, with an emphasis on philological, literary, cultural and general humanities subjects. The archeology of the ancient Orient is only taken into consideration. Included are essays from journals and collections, reviews and books. The data of the cuneiform bibliography (KeiBi) published since 1940 in the magazine Orientalia (NS Bd. 9) of the Pontifical Biblical Institute. The new editions of the printed cuneiform bibliography are included in KeiBi with a delay of two years.

Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative

The Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative is a database organized by an international group of assyrologists, museum councils, and historians of science, who collected cuneiform tablets from the period of about 3350 BC. Until about 400 BC. Digital. The project is headed by the University of California in Los Angeles and the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin.

Ancient Near Eastern Studies (Propylaeum-DOK)

Propylaeum-DOK is the full-text server of Propylaeum, the Virtual Library for Classical Studies and provides an opportunity for publishing, indexing and long-preservation of documents on Classical Studies. Propylaeum-DOK is a service of the University Library of Heidelberg, which within the scopes of its special subject collections Classical Archaeology and Egyptology funded byGerman Research Foundation,

Assyriology General

The Ancient World Digital Library (AWDL) is an initiative of the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) at New York University. AWDL will identify, collect, curate, and provide access to a broad range of scholarly materials relevant to the study of the ancient world.

Cuneiform Library at Cornell University   
Through the combined efforts of the Department of Near Eastern Studies, the Cornell University Library and the Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI) at UCLA the substantial collection of cuneiform tablets in the Jonathan and Jeannette Rosen Ancient Near Eastern Seminar in the Department of Near Eastern Studies, Cornell University is in the process of being made available as an online data set.

Cuneiform script  
Cuneiform script is one of the earliest systems of writing, distinguished by its wedge-shaped marks on clay tablets, made by means of a blunt reed for a stylus. The name cuneiform itself simply means “wedge shaped”, from the Latin cuneus “wedge” and forma “shape,” and came into English usage probably from Old French cunéiforme.

Before Pythagoras: The Culture of Old Babylonian Mathematics  
Since the nineteenth century, thousands of cuneiform tablets dating to the Old Babylonian Period (c. 1900-1700 BCE) have come to light at various sites in ancient Mesopotamia (modern Iraq). A significant number record mathematical tables, problems, and calculations. In the 1920s these tablets began to be systematically studied by Otto Neugebauer, who spent two decades transcribing and interpreting tablets housed in European and American museums.

The Chicago Assyrian Dictionary Project  
The Chicago Assyrian Dictionary, initiated in 1921 by James Henry Breasted, is compiling a comprehensive dictionary of the various dialects of Akkadian, the earliest known Semitic language that was recorded on cuneiform texts that date from c. 2400 B.C. to A.D. 100 which were recovered from archaeological excavations of ancient Near Eastern sites.

Late Old Babylonian Personal Names Index (LOB-PNI)   
Welcome to the Late Old Babylonian Personal Names Index. This searchable file of personal names derives from cuneiform texts chiefly dating to the reigns of the last three kings of the First Dynasty of Babylon, 1683-1595 B.C. Version 3 indexes 14,315 unique attestations of personal names from almost 3,000 texts, including 4,678 entries from around 700 unpublished texts.

The Research Archives of the Oriental Institute, University of Chicago  
The catalog includes books, periodicals, contributions from anthologies, and reviews from the research fields of ancient Oriental and Early Asian Archeology in the Oriental Institute, University of Chicago. Retrospectively, all older holdings should also be recorded. Currently, more than 200,000 entries have been included (as of February 2009).

Iraqi Archaeology Digital Texts

The Iraq Digitized Book Project’s Iraqi Archaeology Digital Texts Collection was developed by the Stony Brook University Libraries in collaboration with Dr. Elizabeth Stone as part of an U.S. Aid grant awarded to the university. The project sought to re-build libraries and library collections within Iraq by providing research libraries within the country with remote access to digital representations of analog objects located in U.S. universities and libraries via the Internet and World Wide Web.

The Archive of Mesopotamian Archaeological Reports (AMAR)

The aim of the AMAR project is to digitize 500 archaeological site reports describing archaeological excavations both in Iraq and in the immediately surrounding areas (Turkey, Syria, Iran and the Gulf). This will include both out-of-copyright as well as in-copyright and in-print materials. This online collection is intended to provide basic sources of information to our colleagues in Iraq, and also other archaeologists working in the Middle East.

Mesopotamia

Widely considered to be the cradle of civilization by the Western world, Bronze Age Mesopotamia included Sumer and the Akkadian, Babylonian, and Assyrian empires, all native to the territory of modern-day Iraq. In the Iron Age, it was controlled by the Neo-Assyrian and Neo-Babylonian Empires.

Bibliography of texts from Old Babylonian archives   
“ARCHIBAB: Babylonian Archives (20th-17th centuries B.C.)” The project figures into the activities of UMR 7192 of the CNRS (Near East, Caucasus: languages, archaeology and civilizations; dir. Thomas Römer), a partner of the ANR within the context of its current financial support. École pratique des Hautes Études (President Hubert Bost) acts as supervisory administrator; the premises are provided by Collège de France (Institute of the ancient Near East; dir. Thomas Römer).

Searches On Mesopotamia  
HEIDI Catalogue for the libraries of Heidelberg University. Heidelberg historical collections – digital

AWOL – The Ancient World Online  
This publication systematically describes ancient-world information resources on the world-wide web. The bibliographic data presented herein has been programmatically extracted from the content of AWOL – The Ancient World Online (ISSN 2156-2253) and formatted in accordance with a structured data model. In continuous operation since 2009, AWOL is a blog authored by Charles E. Jones, Tombros Librarian for Classics and Humanities at the Pattee Library, Penn State University.

Ancient Near East and the Ancient Mediterranean 
ETANA is a multi-institutional collaborative project initiated in August 2000, as an electronic publishing project designed to enhance the study of the history and culture of the ancient Near East. Funded initially by a planning grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, then by a larger digitization grant from the same foundation, the ETANA web portal was launched in 2001. The founding institutions and associations that conceived and implemented this project were: Abzu is a guide to networked open access data relevant to the study and public presentation of the Ancient Near East and the Ancient Mediterranean world.

The Ancient World Mapping Center  
The Ancient World Mapping Center is an interdisciplinary research center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The Center promotes cartography, historical geography, and geographic information science as essential disciplines within the field of ancient studies through innovative and collaborative research, teaching, and community outreach activities.

Cambridge Histories – Ancient History & Classical Studies   
Presenting history as a continuous and evolutionary process, the Cambridge Histories offer a big picture perspective in each subject area, making them essential reading for anyone researching or studying a subject that has an historical element.

Ancient History (Propylaeum-DOK)   
Propylaeum-DOK is the full-text server of Propylaeum, the Virtual Library for Classical Studies and provides an opportunity for publishing, indexing and long-preservation of documents on Classical Studies. Propylaeum-DOK is a service of the University Library of Heidelberg,

Excavations (Archaeology) — Central Asia — Periodicals   
The Ancient World Digital Library (AWDL) is an initiative of the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) at New York University. AWDL will identify, collect, curate, and provide access to a broad range of scholarly materials relevant to the study of the ancient world.

Brill’s ancient world selections  
The Ancient World Digital Library (AWDL) is an initiative of the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) at New York University. AWDL will identify, collect, curate, and provide access to a broad range of scholarly materials relevant to the study of the ancient world.

Papyrus Archives in Graeco-Roman Egypt  
Trismegistos [TM], called after the famous epithet of Hermes – Thoth, the Egyptian god of wisdom and writing who also played a major role in Greek religion and philosophy, is a platform aiming to surmount barriers of language and discipline in the study of texts from the ancient world, particularly late period Egypt and the Nile valley (roughly BC 800 – 800 AD).

Leuven Database of Ancient Books 
The present database attempts to collect the basic information on all ancient literary texts, as opposed to documents. At present, it includes 15784 items, dating from the fourth century B.C. to A.D. 800 and incorporating authors from Homer (8th cent. B.C.) to Romanus Melodus and Gregorius the Great (6th cent. A.D.), including 3671 texts of which the author can no longer be identified (to find an empty field, type “=” (without the quotes) in the field authorname).

Suda On Line   
a massive 10th century Byzantine Greek historical encyclopedia of the ancient Mediterranean world, covering the whole of Greek and Roman antiquity and also including Biblical and Christian material.

Pleiades   
Pleiades gives scholars, students, and enthusiasts worldwide the ability to use, create, and share historical geographic information about the ancient world in digital form. At present, Pleiades has extensive coverage for the Greek and Roman world, and is expanding into Ancient Near Eastern, Byzantine, Celtic, and Early Medieval geography.

Oxford Reference Online – Classical Studies   
Scholarly online dictionaries and encyclopedias on classical literature and civilization from Oxford University Press. Access to a number of dictionaries published by Oxford University Press on the topic of classical literature and civilization. Search sources collectively or search within an individual title. Titles include: The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization, The Concise Oxford Companion to Classical Literature, Who’s Who in the Classical World, The Pocket Oxford Latin Dictionary (English-Latin, The Pocket Oxford Latin Dictionary (Latin-English).

UC Berkeley OskiCat Library   
OskiCat includes materials in most libraries on the UC Berkeley campus, but some important libraries are only partially covered, and some are not covered at all. To find items in these libraries, check the catalogs noted below.

Classical Studies   
Cambridge is one of the world’s leading publishers of research in classical studies, with a list that covers all aspects of enquiry into the ancient world. Our books are at the forefront of the discipline and have been recognised for their broad-ranging, thought-provoking scholarship. Our publishing spans the full range of classical enquiry and pedagogy: critical editions of ancient texts, commentaries, literary and historical analysis, classical archaeology, theoretical perspectives, reception studies, course texts, companions and source books.

Ancient history  
Cambridge is one of the world’s leading publishers of research in classical studies, with a list that covers all aspects of enquiry into the ancient world. Our books are at the forefront of the discipline and have been recognised for their broad-ranging, thought-provoking scholarship. Our publishing spans the full range of classical enquiry and pedagogy: critical editions of ancient texts, commentaries, literary and historical analysis, classical archaeology, theoretical perspectives, reception studies, course texts, companions and source books.

Arthur Evans Archive (Knossos excavations)  
The Arthur Evans archive consists of the archaeological records and papers of Sir Arthur Evans (Keeper of the Ashmolean Museum, 1884-1908), which he bequeathed to the Museum on his death in 1941. A large part of these relate to his excavations at the Bronze Age site of Knossos on Crete, carried out between 1900 and 1931.

Perseus Collection Greek and Roman Materials  
Primary and secondary sources for the study of ancient Greece and Rome

Classical Archaeology (Propylaeum Database)  
Classical Archaeology is concerned with the material and visually conceivable heritage of Greek and Roman culture. It comprises its precursors (e.g. the Mycenean culture during the Bronze Age), its aftermath (e.g. early Byzantine Art) and its connections to neighbouring cultures. Geographically, the subject concentrates primarily on Greece, Asia Minor and Italy; furthermore it includes the Roman provinces of the Roman imperial period.

Brussels Coptic Database   
This project is also fully integrated with the Trismegistos plateform, which now numbers more than 100 000 records. The database regroups all the documentary Coptic texts published, i.e. more than 8000 documents. This database is updated periodically.

Heidelberger Complete index of the Greek papyri of Egypt (HGV)   
The Gesamtverzeichnis (HGV) offers a new research tool for anyone interested in using the Greek documentary papyri for philological or historical work. Ever since early in this century, when it became impossible for anyone to keep track easily of the large number of newly-published texts, papyrologists and others have talked about the need for a general register of all published papyri, to help the searcher navigate in the sea of documents.

J.Enoch Powell A Lexicon to Herodotus  
From this material, abandoning my own, I compiled the present work, which attempts to combine the advantages of a lexicon with those of an index: it is an index in so far as it notes every occurrence of every word or name used by Herodotus, kai/ alone excepted; it is a lexicon in the sense that all words are translated and the references classified by meaning and construction.

R. J. Cunliffe, A Lexicon of the Homeric Dialect  
R. J. Cunliffe, A Lexicon of the Homeric Dialect was published by Blackie and Son Limited, London, Glasgow, and Bombay in 1924. Compared to the lexicon by G. A. Autenrieth (A Homeric Dictionary, NY 1895) which has been available in searchable form online for some time, Cunliffe has broader coverage of the Homeric vocabulary, fuller grammatical information and extensive examples of vocabulary usage which makes it particularly suitable for hypertext rendering.

Phrygia in the Iron Age   
This site is focussed on Phrygia in the Iron Age, comprised between the 10th and the 4th century B.C. : the independant Phrygia as opposed to Phrygia as a roman province. This site offers an overview of different aspects of the Phrygian culture in the first millennium B.C.

Brill’s New Jacoby  
Provides a revised edition of the Greek texts of Felix Jacoby’s Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker. Includes Greek texts (often in newer editions) and English translations of and commentary on the fragmentary Greek historians edited by Jacoby.

Rise and Fall of the Roman World / Index   
nformation on articles in the volumes published so far of the series ‘Rise and Fall of the Roman World’ (ANRW). The ANRW is an international joint work of the antiquities and historical sciences. The task is to deal with all the important aspects of the ancient Roman world, as well as its survival and aftermath in the medieval and modern times, according to the current state of research in individual contributions.

Fabrics of the Central Mediterranean   
is a database for specialists of Greek, Punic and Roman pottery. The identification of the provenance of ancient pottery is one of the most important topics of current pottery research as the place of origin of a certain object can be used as an indicator for cultural contacts, economic exchange, or change in political power, to mention only a few.

The Campbell Bonner Magical Gems Database  
The designation ‘magical gem’ is a category of modern archaeology, which denotes the most sophisticated amulet type of the Roman Imperial Period. Magical gems were carved of precious stones sized 1 to 3 centimeters, chiefly between the 1st century BC to the 4th century AD, and were designed to bring their owners health, prosperity and love.

Zenon DAI: Central online catalog of the German Archaeological Institute  
Monographs, periodicals and essays from the collections of the DAI have been shown. In addition to this, a search for content is offered in the following bibliographies: “Archaeological Bibliography” of the departments Rome, Berlin, Athens and Istanbul (with the stock since 1956), the DAI Madrid Bibliography on the Archeology of the Iberian Peninsula And “Eurasia’s Archeology Bibliography” of the Eurasia Department.

The Roman Provincial Coinage   
The Roman Provincial Coinage Online project is confined to the periods AD 96–192, 238–244 (Asia only) and 249–254, but other periods might be put online in the future. The database contains information on 24,475 coin types, based on 107,173 specimens (19,263 of which have images).

The Roman Law Library   
Collection of texts on Roman law (Corpus Iuris Cvilis, Codex Theodosiani, Ulpiani Regulae, Pauli Sententiae, and other sources of Late Antiquity)

Collection of drawings from ancient Egypt by Ippolito Rosellini 
The drawings made by artists in tow Egyptologist Ippolito Rosellini in the Tuscan archaeological Shipping in Egypt are fundamental to the knowledge of the Egyptian civilization. The iconographic material was produced in tempera and watercolor pencil and reproduces the true bas-reliefs and paintings found in the temples and tombs of Ancient Egypt

Historical Maps   
The Travelers in the Middle East Archive (TIMEA) is a digital archive that focuses on Western interactions with the Middle East, particularly travels to Egypt during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. TIMEA offers electronic texts such as travel guides, museum catalogs, and travel narratives, photographic and hand-drawn images of Egypt, and historical maps of Egypt and Cyprus.

Champollion and Rosellini Egyptian Expeditions  
The works of the Champollion and Rosellini expeditions are invaluable and irreplaceable because they contain information and illustrations of Egyptian monuments made early in the exploration and exploitation of that country. They are two of the oldest and most important publications to include accurate copies of reliefs and inscriptions and are still regularly consulted for many of them.

Ancient Egyptian Architecture Online   
Ancient Egyptian Architecture Online provides vetted and standardized architectural drawings of a selection of ancient Egyptian buildings. These represent architecture from modest workmen’s houses to temple complexes, dating from the Old Kingdom through Late Antiquity. Aegaron considers architectural drawings as historic sources: each plan is accompanied by a critical apparatus. The plans can be downloaded freely for private and research purposes (terms of use).

Nubia: Ancient Kingdoms of Africa   
Nubia: Ancient Kingdoms of Africa features over 120 objects illustrating the remarkable and distinctive aesthetics of Nubian art. The exhibition traces Nubia’s rich culture, which flourished in present day Sudan and southern Egypt, from its earliest kingdoms (3200–3000 BC) to the Kushite period (900–400 BC) during which Nubians rose to conquer Egypt and fought against the Assyrian empire.

Amheida I. Ostraka from Trimithis, Volume 1: Texts from the 2004–2007 Seasons.   
The ostraka presented in this volume come from excavations conducted at the site of Amheida, located in the northwestern part of the Dakhla Oasis in the western desert of Egypt. Dakhla was part of the Great Oasis of the Graeco-Roman period. Amheida is the largest surviving archaeological site in Dakhla today, although it was certainly smaller in antiquity than the historic capital of the oasis,

Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology  
The Petrie Museum houses an estimated 80,000 objects, making it one of the greatest collections of Egyptian and Sudanese archaeology in the world. It illustrates life in the Nile Valley from prehistory through the time of the pharaohs, the Ptolemaic, Roman and Coptic periods to the Islamic period.

The Thesaurus Linguae Aegyptiae   
The Thesaurus Linguae Aegyptiae is a publishing and research platform for ancient Egyptian language data. He offers a digital dictionary of the Egyptian language as well as an electronically edited corpus of Egyptian texts. Since 2013 he is part of the new project to a diachronic developed lexical system. This provides the opportunity to research the textcorpus as well as the vocabulary beyond the boundaries of the written forms and all the language stages of the Egyptian language and to understand their language change over more than 4,000 years into the Coptic.

The Afroasiatic Index Project   
The Afroasiatic Index Project is a scholarly initiative that aims at creating an etymological database of Afroasiatic languages. Afroasiatic languages are a group of related languages spoken by various communities from a large area in West African centered around Lake Chad (Chadic), all the way across North Africa (Berber) into Egypt (Egyptian), Ethiopia, and Somalia, and down the Great Rift Valley to the foot of Mt. Kilimanjaro (Cushitic / Omotic).

Specialist Catalog Egyptology / University Library Heidelberg   
The specialist catalog contains information on the complete Egyptian literature acquired by UB Heidelberg. The entire relevant subject literature, including non-book media, is collected for the Ancient (Pharaonic) Egypt. The subject area covers all aspects of the pharaonic high culture such as writing, language, art, archeology, history, etc., but also the Coptic language of Christian Egypt as well as Coptic literature. The collection focus on Egyptology at UB Heidelberg is part of the program of supra – regional literature supply in the Federal Republic of Germany, which is funded and funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG).

topographical bibliography of ancient egyptian hieroglyphic texts statues   
Database version of the bibliography on Egyptian hieroglyphs, statues, reliefs and paintings. The great Egyptologist Jaroslav Černý referred to the Topographical Bibliography as the ‘Scotland Yard of Egyptology’, where the skills of detective work were used to track down monuments and publications.

Database of Early Dynastic inscriptions By Ilona Regulski   
The database contains all the inscriptions available from the earliest Egyptian period, from the first written documents of the tomb Uj (Naqada IIIA1, ca. 3250 BC) to the first complete sentences from the time of the Djoser (about 2700 BC) Chr.). It contains 4.524 inscriptions (as of October 2013): The original sources, published by J. Kahl (The system of Egyptian hieroglyphs in the Oth-3rd dynasty, GOF IV / 29, 1994, 171-417) provided the first sources In the course of which more than 700 additional inscriptions could be added. The database can be queried, among other things, by date, origin, type of inscription, dating criteria, and current location.

Champollion and Rosellini Egyptian Expeditions  
The works of the Champollion and Rosellini expeditions are invaluable and irreplaceable because they contain information and illustrations of Egyptian monuments made early in the exploration and exploitation of that country. They are two of the oldest and most important publications to include accurate copies of reliefs and inscriptions and are still regularly consulted for many of them.

Cambridge Library Collection – Egyptology  
The large-scale scientific investigation of Egyptian antiquities by Western scholars began as an unintended consequence of Napoleon’s invasion of Egypt during which, in 1799, the Rosetta Stone was discovered. The military expedition was accompanied by French scholars, whose reports prompted a wave of enthusiasm that swept across Europe and North America resulting in the Egyptian Revival style in art and architecture.

UB Heidelberg Egyptology Collection  
Within its special subject collection Egyptology the UB Heidelberg is also an extensive and very important ingredient Egyptological literature from the 16th to early 20th century, fully digitized from the selected works and makes them available on the Internet.

Egyptology (Propylaeum-DOK)   
Propylaeum-DOK is the full-text server of Propylaeum, the Virtual Library for Classical Studies and provides an opportunity for publishing, indexing and long-preservation of documents on Classical Studies. Propylaeum-DOK is a service of the University Library of Heidelberg, which within the scopes of its special subject collections Classical Archaeology and Egyptology funded byGerman Research Foundation,

Acient Egypt (Egyptology)   
The Ancient World Digital Library (AWDL) is an initiative of the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) at New York University. AWDL will identify, collect, curate, and provide access to a broad range of scholarly materials relevant to the study of the ancient world.

Demotic Texts Published on the World Wide Web   
Demotic Texts Published on the World Wide Web is intended to be a constantly up-dated collection of the Demotic language material available on the World Wide Web and is the beginning of a catalogue of all Egyptian language materials published on-line.